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Calculus I, II, II, and differential equations
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Mar 29, 2015

Tonight, on the World's Most Extreme Values. One 2-variable function. One closed region. One shot at glory. Don't miss it!

...sorry, had to get that out of my system. The problem we're going to look at today goes like this:

Find the absolute minimum(s) and maximum(s) of the function $f(x,y)=xe^y-x^2-e^y$ on the rectangle with vertices $(0,0)$, $(0,1)$, $(2,0)$, and $(2,1)$.

Ok, we've seen extreme value (i.e., maximum and minimum) problems like this in Calculus 1. If you don't remember the gist of this, please go back and check your notes/textbook first. Just to review, the basic idea is that we find the derivative of a function, set it equal to zero, and solve the resulting equation. Together with the points where the the function is non-differentiable, these solutions give us a set of critical points where the function might have a maximum, minimum, or inflection point.

Our example has two new issues we must confront. First of all, we have a function of two variables, so what does it mean to "set the de...

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